Roger Stringer   About ▾

I'm Roger Stringer, a DevOps engineer, developer, author, chef, speaker, dad. Founder of Flybase.

Comparing Chromebooks


I’ve mentioned using Chromebooks 1 and Chromeboxes 2 a few times before.

But I thought I’d compare a couple Chromebook models as I recently got to try a few different ones out curtesy of Google.

I’m specifically comparing the Acer C720P which I’ve had for a year and the Acer C670. I’ll also talk briefly about the ASUS Flip chromebook.

Acer C720P

Acer C720P

The Acer C720P chromebook is a nice chromebook, it was my main backup laptop (for days when I didn’t feel like carrying my macbook around) for the past year, and with an 11.6-Inch HD Touchscreen, 4 GB RAM, and 32 GB SSD it’s worked well.

When I first got this chromebook, I said I’d never use the touchscreen, but that opinion quickly changed and the touchscreen actually got used more than I thought it would have.

My biggest thing with this chromebook was the keyboard, the enter key was cut in half to make room for a second key and you often found yourself pressing that key instead, which made typing a tad annoying, but the touchscreen made up for it.

Acer 670

Acer 670

The Acer 670 is also a nice chromebook, and I’ve actually been using it since I got it rather than the 720. Which may seem odd since this chromebook is not a touchscreen and has only 2 GB of RAM and a 16 GB SSD drive.

So why the downgrade?

It actually doesn’t feel like a downgrade at all, in some areas it feels faster. For one thing, Acer corrected that keyboard layout so that typing is now nicer, and since that key isn’t there to make more mistakes, typing is faster, which means productivity is also faster.

The smaller hard drive is also minor as I keep an SD card inserted into the chromebook, flush with the chassis, which gives me an extra 128 GB of space, plus Google Drive gives you 1 TB of space to use, so yeah, that’s minor.

The other thing is that the beauty of ChromeOS itself is that you can switch devices no problem and have things work well. I’m especially a big fan of Code Anywhere, which lets me edit code, SSH into my servers, and do my work the same as if I was on my Macbook.



One last chromebook to talk about is the ASUS Flip chromebook.

This chromebook was an interesting model to play with. It’s got a lot in common with the C720P, while having the same hard drive size as the 670.

The biggest draw to this device is that it flips, so it’s a standard laptop one minute, then it flips into a chromeOS tablet the next.

I’d like it better if the flip let the keyboard be hidden, but it works well, things are tucked away nicely and it gives you a few different positioning modes.

So which one wins?

If you click this link, you’ll see for yourself that there so many different models of chromebooks out there.

These three are actually just a drop in the bucket over all, but they’re the three I’ve found best.

In terms of the three, I’ve liked the Acer 670 the best, and my 7 year old has taken over the Acer C720P, with her old Samsung chromebook going to a friend.

If you want a touchscreen experience then the Acer C720P is nice, as is the ASUS Flip, whereas for pure typing, the Acer 670 wins out.