{ "version": "https://jsonfeed.org/version/1", "user_comment": "This feed allows you to read the posts from this site in any feed reader that supports the JSON Feed format. To add this feed to your reader, copy the following URL -- https://rogerstringer.com/feed/json -- and add it your reader.", "home_page_url": "https://rogerstringer.com", "feed_url": "https://rogerstringer.com/feed/json", "title": "Roger Stringer", "description": "Thoughts, stories and ideas for finding a work-life balance.", "icon": "https://s3.amazonaws.com/rstringer-assets/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/26091029/cropped-codedgeekery.png", "items": [ { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/07/09/apple-updates-macbook-air-and-macbook-pro-for-back-to-school-season-kills-off-macbook/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/07/09/apple-updates-macbook-air-and-macbook-pro-for-back-to-school-season-kills-off-macbook/", "title": "Apple updates MacBook Air and MacBook Pro for back-to-school season, kills off MacBook", "content_html": "\n

Apple:

\n\n\n\n

Apple today updated MacBook Air, adding True Tone to its Retina display for a more natural viewing experience, and lowering the price to $1,099, with an even lower price of $999 for college students.

[…]

In addition, the entry-level $1,299 13-inch MacBook Pro has been updated with the latest 8th-generation quad-core processors, making it two times more powerful than before. It also now features Touch Bar and Touch ID, a True Tone Retina display and the Apple T2 Security Chip, and is available for $1,199 for college students.


\n\n\n\n

Apple has also killed off the 12 inch Macbook in this release, but they are keeping the third generation butterfly keyboards.

\n

The post Apple updates MacBook Air and MacBook Pro for back-to-school season, kills off MacBook appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "Apple:\n\n\n\nApple today updated MacBook Air, adding True Tone to its Retina display for a more natural viewing experience, and lowering the price to $1,099, with an even lower price of $999 for college students.[…]In addition, the entry-level $1,299 13-inch MacBook Pro has been updated with the latest 8th-generation quad-core processors, making it two times more powerful than before. It also now features Touch Bar and Touch ID, a True Tone Retina display and the Apple T2 Security Chip, and is available for $1,199 for college students.\n\n\n\nApple has also killed off the 12 inch Macbook in this release, but they are keeping the third generation butterfly keyboards.\nThe post Apple updates MacBook Air and MacBook Pro for back-to-school season, kills off MacBook appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-07-09T12:25:35-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-07-09T12:25:36-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "tags": [ "Links" ] }, { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/07/04/john-gruber-on-the-post-ive-future-of-design-at-apple/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/07/04/john-gruber-on-the-post-ive-future-of-design-at-apple/", "title": "John Gruber On the Post-Ive Future of Design at Apple", "content_html": "\n

John Gruber:

\n\n\n\n

I did a brief chat with Rene Ritchie for Vector, his YouTube show, over the weekend. I thought it was a great little interview\u2009\u2014\u2009far more condensed than\u00a0my own podcast, and with a full transcript to boot.

One key point that I missed in [my first take on Ive\u2019s departure] is that having design chiefs Evans Hankey (Industrial Design) and Alan Dye (Human Interface Design) report directly to COO Jeff Williams\u00a0does\u00a0make sense organizationally. What I had missed is that coincident with the announcement of Ive\u2019s departure,\u00a0Apple promoted Sabih Khan to senior vice president of operations.

Apple hasn\u2019t had an SVP of operations since Jeff Williams held the title, back when Tim Cook was COO under Steve Jobs. Back then Williams ran operations while Cook ran the company and Jobs devoted his remaining time to new products.

\n\n\n\n

\n

The post John Gruber On the Post-Ive Future of Design at Apple appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "John Gruber:\n\n\n\nI did a brief chat with Rene Ritchie for Vector, his YouTube show, over the weekend. I thought it was a great little interview\u2009\u2014\u2009far more condensed than\u00a0my own podcast, and with a full transcript to boot.One key point that I missed in [my first take on Ive\u2019s departure] is that having design chiefs Evans Hankey (Industrial Design) and Alan Dye (Human Interface Design) report directly to COO Jeff Williams\u00a0does\u00a0make sense organizationally. What I had missed is that coincident with the announcement of Ive\u2019s departure,\u00a0Apple promoted Sabih Khan to senior vice president of operations.Apple hasn\u2019t had an SVP of operations since Jeff Williams held the title, back when Tim Cook was COO under Steve Jobs. Back then Williams ran operations while Cook ran the company and Jobs devoted his remaining time to new products.\n\n\n\n\nThe post John Gruber On the Post-Ive Future of Design at Apple appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-07-04T09:43:53-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-07-04T09:43:55-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "tags": [ "Links" ] }, { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/06/27/after-nearly-30-years-jony-ive-leaving-apple-to-start-new-design-firm/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/06/27/after-nearly-30-years-jony-ive-leaving-apple-to-start-new-design-firm/", "title": "After nearly 30 years, Jony Ive leaving Apple to start new design firm", "content_html": "\n

Chris Welch, writing for The Verge:

\n\n\n\n

Apple\u2019s chief design officer Jonathan Ive is departing the company, bringing an end to a tenure spent crafting some of technology\u2019s most influential products, including the iPhone. Ive is leaving his official role at Apple \u201cto form an independent design company which will count Apple among its primary clients.\u201d

The company is called LoveForm, and Ive will be joined by famed designer Marc Newsom on the new venture. Despite stepping down from his executive position, Ive and Apple both claim he will still work \u201con a range of projects with Apple.\u201d

Ive is one of the world\u2019s most esteemed industrial designers and has worked on products including a wide range of Macs, the iPhone, the iPad, the Apple Watch, and more. He also designed the company\u2019s \u201cspaceship\u201d Apple Park campus.

Most recently, Ive voiced a design video about the new Mac Pro launching later this year.\u00a0

\n\n\n\n

Interesting, and best wishes to Jony on his new edeavour.

\n

The post After nearly 30 years, Jony Ive leaving Apple to start new design firm appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "Chris Welch, writing for The Verge:\n\n\n\nApple\u2019s chief design officer Jonathan Ive is departing the company, bringing an end to a tenure spent crafting some of technology\u2019s most influential products, including the iPhone. Ive is leaving his official role at Apple \u201cto form an independent design company which will count Apple among its primary clients.\u201d The company is called LoveForm, and Ive will be joined by famed designer Marc Newsom on the new venture. Despite stepping down from his executive position, Ive and Apple both claim he will still work \u201con a range of projects with Apple.\u201dIve is one of the world\u2019s most esteemed industrial designers and has worked on products including a wide range of Macs, the iPhone, the iPad, the Apple Watch, and more. He also designed the company\u2019s \u201cspaceship\u201d Apple Park campus. Most recently, Ive voiced a design video about the new Mac Pro launching later this year.\u00a0\n\n\n\nInteresting, and best wishes to Jony on his new edeavour.\nThe post After nearly 30 years, Jony Ive leaving Apple to start new design firm appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-06-27T14:15:44-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-06-27T14:15:46-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "image": "https://s3.amazonaws.com/rstringer-assets/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/27141246/img_00461.jpg", "tags": [ "Links" ] }, { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/06/14/federico-viticci-initial-thoughts-on-ipados/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/06/14/federico-viticci-initial-thoughts-on-ipados/", "title": "Federico Viticci: \u2018initial Thoughts on iPadOS\u2019", "content_html": "\n

Federico Viticci:

\n\n\n\n

When I published my\u00a0Beyond the Tablet\u00a0story a few weeks ago, I was optimistic we’d get a handful of iPad-related features and optimizations at\u00a0WWDC. I did not, however, foresee an\u00a0entire OS\u00a0designed specifically around iPad. And the more I think about it, the more I see iPadOS as a sign of Apple’s willingness to break free from old assumptions and let the iPad be what it’s best at: a portable computer inspired by the Mac, but based on iOS.

I’m back home after a fantastic week at WWDC, and I’m now in the process of sifting through the surprising amount of new software features Apple unveiled in San Jose. It’s going to take me a while to digest all that’s new in\u00a0iOS 13\u00a0and\u00a0Shortcuts2; of course, you should expect my iOS/iPadOS 13 review in the fall, and we will share more hands-on articles and editorials on MacStories and\u00a0Club MacStories\u00a0throughout the summer. For now though, after using the iPadOS beta on my 12.9″ iPad Pro for a few days, I’d like to share some initial considerations on iPadOS and what it means for the future of the platform.

[…]

Since the iPad launched almost 10 years ago, its iOS foundation has been a double-edged sword: on one hand, building iPad on top of iOS gave Apple a head start in terms of performance, app ecosystem, and security that other tablets couldn’t match; on the other, an already-solid iOS foundation may have been the excuse to not aggressively pursue more advanced functionalities.

Apple has only itself to blame if certain segments of the tech press have been calling the iPad “just a big iPod touch” for years, even though it\u00a0clearly wasn’t.
iPadOS suggests that the company has identified a new path for the iPad as a third platform that combines well-trodden ideas from macOS with the intuitive, nimble nature of iOS. To a certain extent, this was true of iPad before, particularly since the days of\u00a0iOS 11, but calling it iPadOS shows a renewed commitment that may provide the necessary impetus for more consistent updates over the next few years.

Ultimately, a new name on its own doesn’t prove that Apple is more serious about a platform than before, which is why we should focus on the actual\u00a0features\u00a0that will launch with iPadOS later this year. And from what I’ve seen and\u00a0discussed\u00a0so far, it looks like Apple is ready to begin the iPad’s next decade with a promising new strategy: inspired by\u00a0tradition, but still uniquely iPad.

\n

The post Federico Viticci: \u2018initial Thoughts on iPadOS\u2019 appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "Federico Viticci:\n\n\n\nWhen I published my\u00a0Beyond the Tablet\u00a0story a few weeks ago, I was optimistic we’d get a handful of iPad-related features and optimizations at\u00a0WWDC. I did not, however, foresee an\u00a0entire OS\u00a0designed specifically around iPad. And the more I think about it, the more I see iPadOS as a sign of Apple’s willingness to break free from old assumptions and let the iPad be what it’s best at: a portable computer inspired by the Mac, but based on iOS.I’m back home after a fantastic week at WWDC, and I’m now in the process of sifting through the surprising amount of new software features Apple unveiled in San Jose. It’s going to take me a while to digest all that’s new in\u00a0iOS 13\u00a0and\u00a0Shortcuts2; of course, you should expect my iOS/iPadOS 13 review in the fall, and we will share more hands-on articles and editorials on MacStories and\u00a0Club MacStories\u00a0throughout the summer. For now though, after using the iPadOS beta on my 12.9″ iPad Pro for a few days, I’d like to share some initial considerations on iPadOS and what it means for the future of the platform.[…]Since the iPad launched almost 10 years ago, its iOS foundation has been a double-edged sword: on one hand, building iPad on top of iOS gave Apple a head start in terms of performance, app ecosystem, and security that other tablets couldn’t match; on the other, an already-solid iOS foundation may have been the excuse to not aggressively pursue more advanced functionalities. Apple has only itself to blame if certain segments of the tech press have been calling the iPad “just a big iPod touch” for years, even though it\u00a0clearly wasn’t.iPadOS suggests that the company has identified a new path for the iPad as a third platform that combines well-trodden ideas from macOS with the intuitive, nimble nature of iOS. To a certain extent, this was true of iPad before, particularly since the days of\u00a0iOS 11, but calling it iPadOS shows a renewed commitment that may provide the necessary impetus for more consistent updates over the next few years.Ultimately, a new name on its own doesn’t prove that Apple is more serious about a platform than before, which is why we should focus on the actual\u00a0features\u00a0that will launch with iPadOS later this year. And from what I’ve seen and\u00a0discussed\u00a0so far, it looks like Apple is ready to begin the iPad’s next decade with a promising new strategy: inspired by\u00a0tradition, but still uniquely iPad.\nThe post Federico Viticci: \u2018initial Thoughts on iPadOS\u2019 appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-06-14T12:13:30-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-06-14T12:13:32-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "image": "https://s3.amazonaws.com/rstringer-assets/wp-content/uploads/2019/06/14121009/2019-06-11-19-13-06.png", "tags": [ "Links" ] }, { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/05/23/panics-playdate/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/05/23/panics-playdate/", "title": "Panic\u2019s Playdate", "content_html": "\n

From the Playdate website:

\n\n\n\n

Hello. We made a brand new handheld gaming system.

It\u2019s yellow. It fits in your pocket. It\u2019s got a beautiful black and white screen. It\u2019s not super cheap, but not super expensive. It includes brand new games from some amazing creators. Plus it has a crank.

OK, yeah, let\u2019s back up a little bit.

For over 20 years\u00a0Panic\u00a0has mostly made Mac and iOS software. Twenty years is a long time, and we wanted to try some new things. To make the most of what we have.

That\u2019s why we started publishing games, like\u00a0Firewatch\u00a0and, soon,\u00a0Untitled Goose Game.

But what if we could push ourselves even further? What if we could build something? A real something that you could hold?

It was harder than we thought, but it\u2019s here.

And it\u2019s called Playdate

[…]

Playdate is our celebration of the video game.

We reached out to some top game designers, like Keita Takahashi and Zach Gage and Bennett Foddy and Shaun Inman.

We showed them Playdate and asked, \u201cWant to make a game for it?\u201d. Then we lost our minds when they said \u201cYeah!\u201d

So Playdate isn\u2019t just the hardware.

It\u2019s twelve brand new video games, one each week.

What are these games? Here\u2019s the thing: we\u2019d like to keep them a secret until they appear on your Playdate. We want to surprise you.

Some are short, some long, some are experimental, some traditional. All are fun.

When your Playdate lights up with a brand new game delivery, we hope you can\u2019t wait to unwrap your gift.

And there\u2019s so much more to come. Playdate is alive with possibilities and surprises, future games and new ways to make them. We\u2019ll have even more to talk about at launch.

\n\n\n\n

Playdate will cost $149 USD when it arrives next year; launch supplies are expected to be limited, so\u00a0sign up to be notified.

\n\n\n\n

I’ve been a fan of Panic’s software since day one, and have bought just about everything they’ve made and continue to use it so I’ll most likely pick up one of these as well.

\n

The post Panic’s Playdate appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "From the Playdate website:\n\n\n\nHello. We made a brand new handheld gaming system.It\u2019s yellow. It fits in your pocket. It\u2019s got a beautiful black and white screen. It\u2019s not super cheap, but not super expensive. It includes brand new games from some amazing creators. Plus it has a crank.OK, yeah, let\u2019s back up a little bit.For over 20 years\u00a0Panic\u00a0has mostly made Mac and iOS software. Twenty years is a long time, and we wanted to try some new things. To make the most of what we have.That\u2019s why we started publishing games, like\u00a0Firewatch\u00a0and, soon,\u00a0Untitled Goose Game.But what if we could push ourselves even further? What if we could build something? A real something that you could hold?It was harder than we thought, but it\u2019s here.And it\u2019s called Playdate[…]Playdate is our celebration of the video game.We reached out to some top game designers, like Keita Takahashi and Zach Gage and Bennett Foddy and Shaun Inman.We showed them Playdate and asked, \u201cWant to make a game for it?\u201d. Then we lost our minds when they said \u201cYeah!\u201dSo Playdate isn\u2019t just the hardware.It\u2019s twelve brand new video games, one each week.What are these games? Here\u2019s the thing: we\u2019d like to keep them a secret until they appear on your Playdate. We want to surprise you.Some are short, some long, some are experimental, some traditional. All are fun.When your Playdate lights up with a brand new game delivery, we hope you can\u2019t wait to unwrap your gift.And there\u2019s so much more to come. Playdate is alive with possibilities and surprises, future games and new ways to make them. We\u2019ll have even more to talk about at launch.\n\n\n\nPlaydate will cost $149 USD when it arrives next year; launch supplies are expected to be limited, so\u00a0sign up to be notified.\n\n\n\nI’ve been a fan of Panic’s software since day one, and have bought just about everything they’ve made and continue to use it so I’ll most likely pick up one of these as well.\nThe post Panic’s Playdate appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-05-23T08:16:38-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-05-23T08:18:09-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "image": "https://s3.amazonaws.com/rstringer-assets/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/23081125/Playdate-hero-shot-6c.jpg", "tags": [ "Links" ] }, { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/05/22/the-case-against-huawei-explained/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/05/22/the-case-against-huawei-explained/", "title": "The case against Huawei, explained", "content_html": "

Russell Brandom, writing for The Verge:

\n
\n

This morning, ARM announced that it was cutting ties with Huawei, in the interest of \u201ccomplying with all of the latest regulations set forth by the U.S. government.\u201d It\u2019s a catastrophe for Huawei\u2019s device business, halting its access to current and future chip designs and coming on the heels of similar breaks from Google and Microsoft. Huawei is in deep, deep trouble, and we still don\u2019t have a clear picture of why.

\n

Security experts have been\u00a0warning about Huawei\u00a0for more than a year, but it\u2019s only in the last week that those warnings have escalated into an all-out trade blockade on the company\u2019s US partners. There\u2019s never been a full accounting of why the US government believes Huawei is such a threat, in large part because of national security interests, which means much of the evidence remains secret. But it\u2019s worth tracing out exactly where the concerns are coming from and where they could go from here.

\n
\n\n\n
\n\n\n\n

\n

The post The case against Huawei, explained appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "Russell Brandom, writing for The Verge:\n\nThis morning, ARM announced that it was cutting ties with Huawei, in the interest of \u201ccomplying with all of the latest regulations set forth by the U.S. government.\u201d It\u2019s a catastrophe for Huawei\u2019s device business, halting its access to current and future chip designs and coming on the heels of similar breaks from Google and Microsoft. Huawei is in deep, deep trouble, and we still don\u2019t have a clear picture of why.\nSecurity experts have been\u00a0warning about Huawei\u00a0for more than a year, but it\u2019s only in the last week that those warnings have escalated into an all-out trade blockade on the company\u2019s US partners. There\u2019s never been a full accounting of why the US government believes Huawei is such a threat, in large part because of national security interests, which means much of the evidence remains secret. But it\u2019s worth tracing out exactly where the concerns are coming from and where they could go from here.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nThe post The case against Huawei, explained appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-05-22T10:55:22-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-05-22T10:55:23-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "tags": [ "Links" ] }, { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/05/08/google-pixel-3a/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/05/08/google-pixel-3a/", "title": "Google Pixel 3A", "content_html": "\n

Dieter Bohn, writing for The Verge:

\n\n\n\n

I am going to break an unwritten rule of tech reviews and tell you the ending right at the top: if you want to buy a new smartphone that costs between $300 and $500, you should buy a Pixel 3A or Pixel 3A XL. It is the best phone in that price range, and it\u2019s actually competitive with more expensive phones in one very important way: the Pixel 3A has a great camera.

For the past few years, buying a new smartphone meant following a nigh-unbreakable rule: if you wanted a good camera, you needed to spend at least 600 bucks. That, or you needed to find an older iPhone or take a shot on something used or refurbished. On the flip side, less expensive Android phones have become remarkably good recently, but they still followed the rule because their cameras are almost universally mediocre.

The $399 Pixel 3A ($479 for the larger 3A XL) doesn\u2019t follow that rule. While it has many of the same compromises you usually make when you buy a cheap phone, the photos it takes are nearly indistinguishable from what comes out of a Pixel 3. Depending on where and when you buy it, the Pixel 3 can cost $200 or $300 more.

In 15 years of reviewing phones, I am not sure if I\u2019ve ever been able to write the following sentence: a $400 phone has a camera that\u2019s among the best you can get on any smartphone.

The rest of the Pixel 3A may not blow you away, but it ain\u2019t bad, either.

\n

The post Google Pixel 3A appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "Dieter Bohn, writing for The Verge:\n\n\n\nI am going to break an unwritten rule of tech reviews and tell you the ending right at the top: if you want to buy a new smartphone that costs between $300 and $500, you should buy a Pixel 3A or Pixel 3A XL. It is the best phone in that price range, and it\u2019s actually competitive with more expensive phones in one very important way: the Pixel 3A has a great camera.For the past few years, buying a new smartphone meant following a nigh-unbreakable rule: if you wanted a good camera, you needed to spend at least 600 bucks. That, or you needed to find an older iPhone or take a shot on something used or refurbished. On the flip side, less expensive Android phones have become remarkably good recently, but they still followed the rule because their cameras are almost universally mediocre.The $399 Pixel 3A ($479 for the larger 3A XL) doesn\u2019t follow that rule. While it has many of the same compromises you usually make when you buy a cheap phone, the photos it takes are nearly indistinguishable from what comes out of a Pixel 3. Depending on where and when you buy it, the Pixel 3 can cost $200 or $300 more.In 15 years of reviewing phones, I am not sure if I\u2019ve ever been able to write the following sentence: a $400 phone has a camera that\u2019s among the best you can get on any smartphone.The rest of the Pixel 3A may not blow you away, but it ain\u2019t bad, either.\nThe post Google Pixel 3A appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-05-08T13:02:19-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-05-08T13:02:21-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "tags": [ "Articles" ] }, { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/04/26/ifixit-pulls-galaxy-fold-teardown/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/04/26/ifixit-pulls-galaxy-fold-teardown/", "title": "iFixit pulls Galaxy Fold teardown", "content_html": "\n

From the IFixit blog:

\n\n\n\n

After two days of intense public interest, iFixit has removed our teardown of Samsung\u2019s Galaxy Fold. That analysis supported our suspicions that the device provided insufficient protection from debris damaging the screen.

We were provided our Galaxy Fold unit by a trusted partner. Samsung has requested, through that partner, that iFixit remove its teardown. We are under no obligation to remove our analysis, legal or otherwise. But out of respect for this partner, whom we consider an ally in making devices more repairable, we are choosing to withdraw our story until we can purchase a Galaxy Fold at retail.

Our team appreciated the chance to look inside this ambitious device. All new products face challenges\u2014this one perhaps more than most. We\u2019re grateful to have shared a glimpse of how Samsung\u2019s engineers addressed some of those challenges, and we look forward to sharing more as soon as possible.

\n\n\n\n

Chances are good that the partner who provided iFixit with the Galaxy Fold review unit is in hot water over this from Samsung.

\n\n\n\n
\n\n\n\n

Some highlights of the teardown before they pulled it included:

\n\n\n\n

Well, we\u2019ve finally got the Samsung Galaxy Fold on our teardown table. This is, without question, an ambitious first-generation device\u2014the idea of having both a smartphone and a tablet in your pocket at all times is pretty exciting!

That said, a number of early reviewers had some durability issues with their review units, ultimately leading to a launch postponement. Are these temporary setbacks? Or are we headed for a full-blown AirPower-style product cancellation?

[…]

Unlike the dull slabs of glass we\u2019re used to, this smartphone/tablet hybrid has lots of potential entry points\u2014and not the good kind.

To achieve the fold, the thin bezel that surrounds (and protects) the screen leaves a gap where the two halves meet.

[…]

This 7 mm gap doesn\u2019t seem like a huge deal, but it leaves the display exposed\u2014so should something accidentally enter, it\u2019s curtains for the screen.

[…]

When closed, the screen is protected\u2014but the spine is flanked by massive gaps that our opening picks hop right into. These gaps are less likely to cause immediate screen damage, but will definitely attract dirt.

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The post iFixit pulls Galaxy Fold teardown appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "From the IFixit blog:\n\n\n\nAfter two days of intense public interest, iFixit has removed our teardown of Samsung\u2019s Galaxy Fold. That analysis supported our suspicions that the device provided insufficient protection from debris damaging the screen.We were provided our Galaxy Fold unit by a trusted partner. Samsung has requested, through that partner, that iFixit remove its teardown. We are under no obligation to remove our analysis, legal or otherwise. But out of respect for this partner, whom we consider an ally in making devices more repairable, we are choosing to withdraw our story until we can purchase a Galaxy Fold at retail.Our team appreciated the chance to look inside this ambitious device. All new products face challenges\u2014this one perhaps more than most. We\u2019re grateful to have shared a glimpse of how Samsung\u2019s engineers addressed some of those challenges, and we look forward to sharing more as soon as possible.\n\n\n\nChances are good that the partner who provided iFixit with the Galaxy Fold review unit is in hot water over this from Samsung. \n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nSome highlights of the teardown before they pulled it included:\n\n\n\nWell, we\u2019ve finally got the Samsung Galaxy Fold on our teardown table. This is, without question, an ambitious first-generation device\u2014the idea of having both a smartphone and a tablet in your pocket at all times is pretty exciting! That said, a number of early reviewers had some durability issues with their review units, ultimately leading to a launch postponement. Are these temporary setbacks? Or are we headed for a full-blown AirPower-style product cancellation?[…]Unlike the dull slabs of glass we\u2019re used to, this smartphone/tablet hybrid has lots of potential entry points\u2014and not the good kind.To achieve the fold, the thin bezel that surrounds (and protects) the screen leaves a gap where the two halves meet.[…]This 7 mm gap doesn\u2019t seem like a huge deal, but it leaves the display exposed\u2014so should something accidentally enter, it\u2019s curtains for the screen.[…]When closed, the screen is protected\u2014but the spine is flanked by massive gaps that our opening picks hop right into. These gaps are less likely to cause immediate screen damage, but will definitely attract dirt.\nThe post iFixit pulls Galaxy Fold teardown appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-04-26T14:41:07-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-04-26T14:47:07-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "image": "https://s3.amazonaws.com/rstringer-assets/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/26144041/Screenshot-2019-04-26-at-2.40.25-PM.png", "tags": [ "Links" ] }, { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/04/22/samsung-delays-galaxy-fold-launch-after-early-display-issues/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/04/22/samsung-delays-galaxy-fold-launch-after-early-display-issues/", "title": "Samsung delays Galaxy Fold launch after early display issues", "content_html": "

Tom Warren, for The Verge:

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Samsung is delaying the release of its first foldable smartphone, the Galaxy Fold.\u00a0The Wall Street Journal\u00a0reports\u00a0that Samsung won\u2019t release the Galaxy Fold until \u201cat least next month\u201d due to issues with review units that technology reporters have revealed.


A\u00a0string of reviewers\u00a0found problems with the display, with it failing for a number of reasons.

The Verge\u2019s own review unit failed due to what appeared to be debris caught between the hinge and the display. Samsung previously said it intends to \u201cthoroughly inspect [the review] units in person,\u201d and was originally planning to continue to release the Galaxy Fold on Friday. Over the weekend, the company postponed launch events in China, and it looked increasingly likely that the device would not go on sale on Friday.


Given the multiple reports of screen failure, some due to reviewers attempting to peel off a protective plastic layer, Samsung\u2019s Galaxy Fold launch delay feels like the best option for the company. While Samsung is aiming to be first to the market with its $1,980 foldable phone, these are critical hardware problems that the company will need to investigate fully.

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The post Samsung delays Galaxy Fold launch after early display issues appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "Tom Warren, for The Verge:\n\n\nSamsung is delaying the release of its first foldable smartphone, the Galaxy Fold.\u00a0The Wall Street Journal\u00a0reports\u00a0that Samsung won\u2019t release the Galaxy Fold until \u201cat least next month\u201d due to issues with review units that technology reporters have revealed. A\u00a0string of reviewers\u00a0found problems with the display, with it failing for a number of reasons.The Verge\u2019s own review unit failed due to what appeared to be debris caught between the hinge and the display. Samsung previously said it intends to \u201cthoroughly inspect [the review] units in person,\u201d and was originally planning to continue to release the Galaxy Fold on Friday. Over the weekend, the company postponed launch events in China, and it looked increasingly likely that the device would not go on sale on Friday.Given the multiple reports of screen failure, some due to reviewers attempting to peel off a protective plastic layer, Samsung\u2019s Galaxy Fold launch delay feels like the best option for the company. While Samsung is aiming to be first to the market with its $1,980 foldable phone, these are critical hardware problems that the company will need to investigate fully.\nThe post Samsung delays Galaxy Fold launch after early display issues appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-04-22T09:02:28-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-04-26T14:24:14-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "image": "https://s3.amazonaws.com/rstringer-assets/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/22090201/img_1935.jpg", "tags": [ "Links" ] }, { "id": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/04/12/star-wars-ix-the-rise-of-skywalker-first-trailer/", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/2019/04/12/star-wars-ix-the-rise-of-skywalker-first-trailer/", "title": "Star Wars IX: The Rise of Skywalker First trailer", "content_html": "\n\n\n\n\n

December 20, 2019… That’s when we’ll see the final film in the Star Wars sequel trilogy. Episode IX has been name “The Rise of Skywalker” and the first trailer has just come out .

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Directed by J.J. Abrams, who directed The Force Awakens back in 2015. According to Abrams, the new installment takes place sometime after Rian Johnson\u2019s The Last Jedi, in which Leia Organa\u2019s Resistance movement was forced on the run and battered by the First Order.

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The post Star Wars IX: The Rise of Skywalker First trailer appeared first on Roger Stringer.

\n", "content_text": "December 20, 2019… That’s when we’ll see the final film in the Star Wars sequel trilogy. Episode IX has been name “The Rise of Skywalker” and the first trailer has just come out .\n\n\n\nDirected by J.J. Abrams, who directed The Force Awakens back in 2015. According to Abrams, the new installment takes place sometime after Rian Johnson\u2019s The Last Jedi, in which Leia Organa\u2019s Resistance movement was forced on the run and battered by the First Order. \nThe post Star Wars IX: The Rise of Skywalker First trailer appeared first on Roger Stringer.", "date_published": "2019-04-12T10:22:16-07:00", "date_modified": "2019-04-12T10:22:18-07:00", "author": { "name": "Roger Stringer", "url": "https://rogerstringer.com/author/freekrai/", "avatar": "https://secure.gravatar.com/avatar/dd9ab8e558ffd2a59f0540d4ac0bdd3f?s=512&d=mm&r=g" }, "tags": [ "Video" ] } ] }