On using your iPhone to take photos of yesterday’s eclipse

Yesterday, I took my daughter to the local college so we could watch the eclipse, it was a clear day, very few clouds so we set up where we could watch it with our eclipse viewers.

I decided to take some pictures of it with my iPhone 7+, using the eclipse viewer as a filter, and this is where it got interesting.

I quickly learned that the phone, will actually ignore the eclipse itself and try to auto focus.

And despite seeing the partial sun in the viewer, the camera will show it as a circle.

I wanted to capture the actual eclipse itself as the moon blotted out the sun, so that wasn’t going to work.

So I played with the various phone apps while I waited, and found the Raw app to be the best, as I could set the settings manually, the result was a few pics that looked nice.

The first photo was taken with the camera app, you got the sun but you also got some reflection off the viewer. To use the default camera app for this, you basically focused on the sun then hit the button quickly as it would bounce back very shortly. But this pic did show the sun starting to disappear.

The second was using the Halide app, a bit better, but we still had some glare.

The final picture was taken with the raw app, it’s bit further away than the other two, since I wasn’t using any zoom, but the combination of focus and brightness let me get the sun pretty nicely.

I actually took a bunch of photos using the raw app once I got the settings how I wanted them, but this was the one I wanted to share.

Roger Stringer spends most of his time solving problems for people, and otherwise occupying himself with being a dad, cooking, speaking, learning, writing, reading, and the overall pursuit of life. He lives in Penticton, British Columbia, Canada